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2008 Visiting Lecture Series

35th ANNUAL VISITING LECTURE SERIES

“Communities in Crisis”

Anthropology is nicely situated and well equipped to help humans deal with such issues and provide both a greater understanding of such events as well as potential remedies. This class is organized around a series of lectures by distinguished scholars which will help us better understand crises as well as aid us in developing solutions to ameliorate the causes and conditions surrounding crises of various kinds. Moreover, these lectures will clearly demonstrate that cultural anthropology, archaeology and physical anthropology as well, of course, as anthropology in general, can help us achieve these goals.

Crises are axial events because, as Eric Wolf (1990) has argued, “the arrangement of societies are most visible when they are challenged by crisis.” Crises, also offer the social scientist a fine opportunity to study the social and cultural construction of reality. Crises are ubiquitous through time and space and found in many different forms. Some examples of crises, among others, include:

  • Mass Emergencies
  • Disasters (both natural and unnatural)
  • Displacement due to development, disasters, economic dislocation, etc.
  • Social Conflict
  • War
  • Genocide
  • Environmental Justice
  • Globalization
  • Immigration
  • Epidemics
  • Environmental disruption

Coordinator: Gregory V. Button
On behalf of the faculty of the Department of Anthropology, The University of Tennessee

Past Lectures

  • August 26
    (T)  McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Three Years After Hurricane Katrina”
    Gregory V. Button, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee
  • August 28
    (TH) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Los Nuevos Desaparecidos” A New Generation of the
    Disappeared”
    Lorena Villao, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee
  • September 2
    (T) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Climate Change and Human Culture:  Lessons from the Past for the Future”
    David Anderson, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee
  • September 4
    (TH)  McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Argentina’s Identity Crisis”
    Graciela Cabana, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee
  • September 8
    (M)  Hodges Library Auditorium ANTH 550
    “Outlaws of the World”
    Carolyn Nordstrom, University of Notre Dame
  • September 9
    (T)  McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Breaking the Rules:  Anthropology for the 21st Century”
    Carolyn Nordstrom, University of Notre Dame
  • September 11
    (TH)  McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    TBA
    Gerald Schroedl, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee
  • September 15
    (M)  Hodges Library Auditorium ANTH 550
    “Writing the History of the Ancient Southwest”
    Stephen Lekson, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • September 16
    (T)  McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Chaco Canyon, Mesa Verde and Post-Classic North America”
    Stephen Lekson, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • September 18
    (T) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “ The Transnational Dilemmas of Eritrean Refugees in Germany and the United States”
    Tricia Redeker-Hepner, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee
  • September 22
    (M) Hodges Library Auditorium ANTH 550
    “Casework, Disaster Operations, and Research at New York City’s Office of Medical Examiner”
    Bradley Adams, New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner
  • September 23
    (T) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “The Role of Forensic Anthropology at NYC’s Office of Chief Medical Examiner”
    Bradley Adams, New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner
  • September 25
    (TH) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “To Welcome or Not to Welcome, That is the Question:  Immigrant Rights and Community Organizing in Tennessee”
    De Ann Pendry, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee
  • September 29
    (M)   Hodges Library Auditorium ANTH 550
    “Victims of Genocide:  Problems in Human Identification and Repatriation”
    Michael Warren, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • September 30
    (T) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Make an Impact:  How Your Education Provides an Opportunity to Serve”
    Michael Warren, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • October 2
    (TH) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “The David Witherspoon Properties:  Nuclear and Chemical Waste in South Knoxville and What Has Been Done”
    John Nolt, Philosophy Department, University of Tennesse
  • October 6
    (M)  Hodges Library Auditorium   ANTH 550
    “Mass Disasters:  Balancing the Requirements of Forensic Science and the Needs of Family Members”
    Paul Sledzik, National Transportation and Safety Board Office of  Disaster Assistance
  • October 7
    (T) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Forensic Anthropology in Mass Disasters”
    Paul Sledzik, National Transportation and Safety Board Office of  Disaster Assistance
  • October 8 – 10 – NO CLASSES – FALL BREAK
  • October 16
    (TH) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Effects of Human Rights Violations and Resettlement on Eritrean Refugee Communities”
    Lily Harmon-Gross, MA Student, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee
  • October 20
    (M) Hodges Library Auditorium ANTH 550
    “The Consequential Damages of Nuclear War:  Lessons from Rongelap”
    Barbara Rose Johnston, Center for Political Ecology
  • October 21
    (T) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “The Commodification of Water”
    Barbara Rose Johnston, Center for Political Ecology
  • October 23
    (TH) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    TBA
  • October 27
    (M) Hodges Library Auditorium ANTH 550
    “Displacements and Disapora:  Global Climate Change, Forced Migration and Human Rights in the 21st Century”
    Anthony Oliver-Smith, University of Florida
  • October 28
    (T) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Out of Place:  Anthropological Research and Theory on Displacement and Resettlement”
    Anthony Oliver-Smith, University of Florida
  • October 30
    (TH) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “The Town That Asbestos Built”
    Kari Saylor, Ph.D. Student, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee
  • November 3
    (M) Hodges Library Auditorium ANTH 550
    “In Ancient Times You Were Like the Grasses in the Field and Like the Sands of the Sea:
    Native Communities Recovering from Demographic Disaster in Colonial Mexico”
    Judith Zeitlin, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • November 4
    (T) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Imperiled Souls or Disordered Cosmos?:  The Sacred Landscape in Mexico”
    Judith Zeitlin, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • November 6
    (TH) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Traffic James and Immigrant Assimilation:  Transportation, Infrastructure and Migrant Adjustment in the South.”
    Stephanie A. Bohon, Sociology Department, University of Tennessee
  • November 10
    (M) Hodges Library Auditorium ANTH 550
    “Bundled History and Hinge Points:  From Agency to Astronomy in ancient America”
    Timothy Pauketat, Illinois University
  • November 11
    (T) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Peace, Violence, Sex and Religion:  Decoding the History of the Ancient Mississippi Valley”
    Timothy Pauketat, Illinois University
  • November 13
    (TH) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Mass Labor Migration and the Rule of Law in the United States of America:  New Chapters in the Shadowy Jurisprudence of Race.”
    Fran Ansley, Professor Emeritus, College of Law, University of Tennessee
  • Week of November 17–21 –NO CLASSES
    ANNUAL AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE
  • November 25
    (T) McClung Museum 63 ANTH 357/450
    “Transition to Agriculture in North America:  Morphology & Diet”
    Dr. Benjamin Auerbach, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee

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